Child Speech Therapy: Advanced Reading Skills📚

 Monica H

Monica H

As discussed last week, pre-reading skills emerge as early as 1 year old. Formal reading instruction begins as children enter elementary school. By 3rd grade, children are expected to use reading skills to learn new content in all school subjects including science, social studies, language arts, and math. Incorporating reading activities into home activities can help children advance their reading abilities needed to excel in all subject areas.  

1) Kindergarten: The alphabet is learned and rehearsed daily in kindergarten. Children begin to decode the alphabetic system by knowing the sounds of each. Children can start to identify sight words by memorizing a combination of word shapes and letters.

 Strategies to incorporate at home:

  • Ask the teacher for the sight words of the week and incorporate them into games at home (I-spy, goldfish).
  • Read alphabet books, such as Seuss’s ABC, and point out words that begin with the same letter.

2) Late kindergarten-1st grade: Reading instruction begins through sound-letter correspondence (phonics) and sight words. By the end of kindergarten, reading becomes more automatic. Children learn that words can be broken down, recombined, and create new words. As children enter first grade, they learn that text explains more than the corresponding picture. Children are able to retell parts of the story including main idea, identify details, and arrange the events in sequence.

 Strategies to incorporate at home:

  • Take turns reading pages of books during story time. If your child has difficulty with a word, model sounding it out.
  • Make your own books by encouraging your children to create or tell stories. Write the story on a piece of paper as they share. They can draw pictures to go along with the story.
  • Join a local library. Motivate your child to learn to read by picking out new stories each week!

3) 2nd–3rd grade:  By age 7-8, children are competent readers with the ability to read longer books independently. They are able to use context and pictures to decipher unknown words. The shift from learning to read to reading to learn begins in 3rd grade. Children are expected to read a variety of text to learn new information in all subjects.

 Strategies to incorporate at home:

  • Pick a series to read together. Here are some great series: Henry and MudgeFrog and Toad are friendsThe Magic Tree HouseJune B. Jones, and A to Z Mysteries.
  • Look up words online or in the dictionary if your child encounters an unfamiliar word. Keep a vocabulary journal with all the new words you look up by writing the word, definition, and picture.

4) 4th–8th grade: Reading shifts to reading comprehension. Children are expected to understand and explore a variety of writing such as expository, narrative, and persuasive text. Textbooks are used across all subjects to extract and learn specific vocabulary and information.

 Strategies to incorporate at home:

  • Research topics together. Topics may range from dinosaurs, technology, dolphins, cooking, etc. Find a variety of books (fictional and nonfictional) to learn more about the topic. Discuss your findings together as well as the different types of text read.
  • Read magazines and newspaper articles. Explain how charts and graphs teach information.

For more information on school age reading, check out Reading Comprehension.

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References:

Ackerman, Shira. “The Guide to 3rd Grade.” Scholastic.com, www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/collection/what-to-expect-grade/guide-to-3rd-grade.

Ackerman, Shira. “The Guide to 4th Grade.” Scholastic.com, www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/collection/what-to-expect-grade/guide-to-4th-grade.

Becky. “Favorite Chapter Books & Series.” This Reading Mama, 11 Aug. 2016, thisreadingmama.com/beginning-chapter-books-series/.

Owens, Robert E. “School-Age Literacy Development.” Language Development: an Introduction, 9th ed., Pearson, 2016, pp. 342–347.

Quick , Carol A. “Reading Milestones.” KidsHealth, May 2013, kidshealth.org/en/parents/milestones.html#.