child service

Lumiere Children’s Therapy: Feeding Tubes

For children who are at risk for complications when eating by mouth, feeding tubes can provide necessary nutrition in a safe manner. Problems with swallowing may occur in one of the four stages of the swallow as described in a previous post,  Swallowing Difficulties in Children. There are six types of feeding tubes available to children with swallowing problems. Below explains the advantages and disadvantages of each type of feeding tube, as well as treatment for children with a feeding tube.

Nasal Feeding Tubes

Nasal feeding tubes are tubes that are entered through the nose down the esophagus. There are three types of nasal feeding tubes: nasogastric, nasoduodenal, and nasojejunal. Deciding between the three types depends on whether your child can tolerate feedings into the stomach. Nasoduodenal and/or nasojejunal tubes are recommended if a child demonstrates chronic vomiting, inhaling or aspirating stomach contents into airway, and/or does not empty feedings well since those tubes bypass the stomach.

Nasogastric Tubes (NG)

NG tube enters through the nose feeding into the stomach through the esophagus (connects the throat to the stomach).

  • Advantages

    • No anesthesia is required for insertion of tube

    • Tubes may be replaced at home

    • Feedings are usually quick

    • NG are used for shorter duration cases, usually 1-6 months

    • Stomach provides a larger capacity for feedings

  • Disadvantages

    • NG tube is visible on face

    • NG tube can be irritating so younger children may pull it out

    • Increased risk of aspiration (food or liquid entering airway) from reflux

    • Increased nasal congestion

    • Possibility to cause oral aversions and/or increase amount of reflux

Nasoduodenal Tubes (ND)

ND tubes enter through the nose and extend into the beginning of the small intestine called the duodenum. The small intestine is the location of the majority of digestion in a person’s body, therefore bypassing the stomach.

  • Advantages

    • No anesthesia is required for insertion of tube

    • Can reduce reflux. Reflux is when stomach bile irritates the food pipe by coming back up the esophagus

    • Reduced risk of aspiration (food or liquid entering airway) from reflux

    • ND are used for short term use, usually 1-6 months

  • Disadvantages

    • Feedings are given slowly over 18-24 hours

    • Child may be self-conscious with visible tube coming from nose

    • Tube may be irritating with younger children possibly pulling it out

    • Potential intolerance to feedings entering small intestine causing bloating, cramping, and/or diarrhea

Nasojejunal (NJ)

NJ tubes are similar to ND as they enter through the nose extending into the small intense. NJ tubes extend further into the small intestine called the jejunal. The tube is designed for children who demonstrate difficulty with feedings into their stomach.

  • Advantages

    • No anesthesia is required for insertion of tube

    • Reduces risk of reflux

    • Reduced risk of aspiration (food or liquid entering airway) from reflux

    • Tubes are primarily recommended for short term use (1-6 months)

  • Disadvantages

    • Feedings are given slowly over time

    • Tube is visual, so may be irritating and/or children may feel self-conscious

    • There are potential intolerances to feedings such as bloating, cramping, or diarrhea

Stomach Feeding Tubes

Feeding tubes are entered directly into the stomach instead of through the esophagus. There are three types of stomach feeding tubes: gastrostomy, gastrojejunal, and jejunostomy. The following are common conditions that may require the use of a stomach tube.

  • Problems of the mouth, esophagus, stomach or intestines presented at birth

  • Prematurity, brain injury, developmental delay, and neuromuscular conditions causing sucking and swallowing disorders

  • Failure to thrive, which is when a child is unable to gain adequate weight to grow appropriately

Gastrostomy Tube (G)

The G-tube is inserted through the abdomen directly into the stomach, completely bypassing the throat. If a child requires tube feeding for over 3 months and/or having difficulties with nasal tubes, gastrostomy tubes are usually recommended.

  • Placement of tubes: There are three types of methods for inserting G-tubes: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), laparoscopic, and open surgical procedure. All procedures take about 30-45 minutes to administer.

    • PEG: most common technique for first placement of G-tube as it does not require surgery. The doctor is able to use a thin, flexible tube with a camera to insert the tube through the mouth and into the stomach

    • Laparoscopic technique: performed by making small incisions into the abdomen and inserting a tiny telescope to help with placement

    • Open surgery: Alternative for cases where a PEG placement is not appropriate

  • Advantages

    • PEG placement does not require surgery

    • Decreased clogging of tube since diameter is larger

    • Larger reservoir in stomach compared to small intestine

    • Child may feel less self-conscious since tube is not visible

    • Decreased chance of tube being pulled out

  • Disadvantages

    • Risk of aspiration due to reflux

    • Family is required to provide extra care to cleaning of tube

    • Surgery may be required depending on placement.

    • Possible skin irritation from leakag

Gastrojejunal (GJ)

A GJ tube is similar to a G-tube as the tube is placed through the skin into the stomach. The difference is a GJ tube has two feeding ports on one tube so that the food enters into the stomach and then down into the small intestine (jejunum portion). G-tubes may be converted into GJ tubes if the child is not tolerating stomach feedings.

  • Advantages

    • Reduced risk of aspiration

    • May reduce reflux

    • Less costly than J-tube placement

    • Tube is hidden, so child may be less self-conscious

  • Disadvantages

    • Potential intolerance of tube

    • Extra care required

    • Potential skin irritation

    • Tube may clog more easily due to smaller diameter

Jejunostomy (J)

A J-tube is placed directly into your child’s small intestine through the skin. This type is not as common for children.

  • Advantages

    • Reduced risk of aspiration and reflux

    • Tube is hidden

  • Disadvantages

    • Potential intolerance to placement of tube

    • Extra care required

    • Potential skin irritation from leakage

    • Tube is small and more likely to clog

    • Surgery is required for placement of jejunostomy

    • Feedings are slow


Treatment of Children with Tube Feedings

Depending on the type of tube and duration of tube feeding, children with tube feedings are at risk for developing oral aversion to food through the mouth. Oral aversion is when a child experiences a fear of eating or drinking and avoids sensation around or in the mouth. Children who are tube-fed often, develop oral aversions because many have learned that food hurts based on a history of medical issues involved with eating (reflux, aspiration, food allergies, and/or motility). In some cases, feeding tubes are used to supplement adequate nutrition but children may be able to eat orally with some limitations on foods, consistencies, textures, and liquids. If your child has been approved to eat some food orally, it is highly encouraged. In order to reduce the risk of developing oral aversion, the following is recommended by speech therapists:

  • Oral sensation. Children with oral aversions will try to avoid sensation around and in the mouth. Children with feeding tubes should continue to experience the same oral sensation in normal routines as children who eat orally, especially oral care. Adequate oral care such as teeth brushing is not only important to reduce aspiration (food getting into the airway) from reflux, but also continues to provide oral sensation. Consider getting a child-proof vibrating toothbrush for extra sensation. During nightly routines, apply lotion to the face while massaging the cheeks, place chapstick on the lips, and make funny faces in the mirror to encourage facial muscle movement.

  • Participate in mealtimes. Children with feeding tubes often miss out on the social, exploratory, playful aspect of eating. Allow your child to continue to experience the fun of eating by helping prep for dinner, setting the table, sitting with the family, and even playing with the food on the table! If your child is able to eat pre-approved food, be sure to have appropriate food available. Most children with oral aversion would prefer not to participate in the act of eating, but continues to benefit from the social aspect of mealtimes.

  • Playing with food. In many feeding therapy approaches, the first step to consuming food orally is accepting food using the other senses: touching, smelling, and licking. Create artwork using edible food by painting with pureed food, making edible play dough, and building structures with variety of food. Show children that food can be fun and non-threatening.

If your child currently has a feeding tube or is planning to receive one, feeding therapy is highly recommended to ensure your child is receiving adequate nutrition and quantity from oral feedings. Speech therapists can provide systematic feeding approaches, including but not limited to mealtime focus, S.O.S. (Sequential Oral Sensory), ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis), baby or child-led weaning, and hunger-based cues. Lumiere Children’s Therapy can provide feeding therapy for your child as well as a home exercise program to assist with carryover into the home environment.

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References

“Addressing Oral Aversions.” Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/navigating-life/oral-eating/feeding-therapy-oral-aversions/.



“ARK's Y-Chew® Oral Motor Chew.” ARK Therapeutic, www.arktherapeutic.com/arks-y-chew-oral-motor-chew/.



“Enteral Tube Program | Home Care Instructions after Placement of a Gastro-Jejunal (G-J) Tube | Boston Children's Hospital.” Boston Childrens Hospital, www.childrenshospital.org/centers-and-services/programs/a-_-e/enteral-tube-program/family-education/giving.



“Feeding Therapy.” Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/navigating-life/oral-eating/feeding-therapy-oral-aversions-2/.



“Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube).” Edited by Steven Dowshen, KidsHealth, The Nemours Foundation, Jan. 2018, kidshealth.org/en/parents/g-tube.html.


Mattingly , Rhonda. “Management of Pediatric Feeding Disorders.” U of L Pediatric Feeding. U of L Pediatric Feeding, 2017, Louisville , University of Louisville .


“Tube Types.” Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/tube-feeding-basics/tubetypes/.


VanDahm, Kelly. “Chapter 9: The Nutritional Foundation.” Pediatric Feeding Disorders Evaluation and Treatment, Therapro, Inc, 2012, pp. 227–227.

Child Speech Therapy: Expressive Language Skills

Hearing your child’s voice for the first time is an exciting, monumental part of parenthood. As the first babbles turn into words, and eventually sentences, your child’s expressive language is developing. Receptive language is the ability to understand language, as expressive language is the ability to use words, sentences, gestures, and writing to communicate with others.

What is expressive language and why is it important?

Expressive language allows a person to communicate wants, needs, thoughts and opinions. Expressive language is the ability to request objects, make choices, ask questions, answer, and describe events. Speaking, gesturing (waving, pointing), writing (texting, emailing), facial expressions (crying, smiling), and vocalizations (crying, yelling) are all variations of expressive language. Children with poor expressive language skills may become frustrated when they cannot communicate their wants and needs. Temper tantrums may occur when they feel tired, sick or hungry and cannot express their current needs.

How do expressive language skills develop?

Expressive language is developed within the first few days after birth. Babies learn to communicate when they are hungry, uncomfortable or tired through crying and facial expressions. They learn to laugh when they are enjoying an interaction with a parent or caregiver, and smile when they are happy. These are all forms of communication. In order for expressive language skills to develop, a child also needs to have strong receptive language, attention, play, social pragmatics and motivation.

  • Receptive language skills is the comprehension of language which is an underlying skill to label objects, answer questions appropriately, and use language in the intended way.

  • Adequate attention skills is an underlying skill for all developmental tasks. The ability to sustain attention is important in order to finish one’s thought and effectively communicate to others.

  • Play skills encourage children to explore their surroundings. Play can be an intrinsic motivator for young children to communicate by requesting, interacting, and labeling toys.

  • Pragmatic skills is the way language is used day to day in social situations. Adequate pragmatic skills allows a person to participate in conversation appropriately.

Expressive Language Milestones & Activities:

The following, outlines expressive language milestones from birth to 7 years old in three categories: birth, preschool, and school age. Learn about the typical developmental stages as well as activities to try at home.

Birth- 3 years old

  • 0-1 years old:

    • Produces pleasure sounds (cooing and gooing)

    • Makes noises when talked to

    • Protests or rejects through gestures or vocalizations

    • Cries differently for different intentions

    • Attempts to imitate facial expressions and movements of caregivers

    • Laughs during parent interaction

    • Between 7-12 months, child will start to babble sounds together (mama, dada)

    • Uses a representational gesture (such as waves bye-bye, claps hands, moves body)

  • Activities to Try at Home:

    • Talk to your child. When your child is developing language, they learn through role models. Talk to your child about your day, what you are doing, and what they can see. It may feel strange at first to talk to your baby without them responding, but the more you talk, the more they learn.

    • Read. It is never too early to start reading books to your child. Point out familiar pictures in the books. If you are reading about animals, make the animal sounds associated with each animal.  

    • Imitate. Imitate all sounds, gestures, and facial expressions your child makes. Repeat a noise they make, and wait for a response. Encouraging imitation can help your child participate in social turn-taking and start to imitate your words.


1-2 years old

  • First words develop around 12 -14 months (hi, mama, dad)

  • Takes turns vocalizing with another person

  • Uses at least two different consonant sounds (early signs include p, b, t, d, m)

  • Around 18-24 months, child begins putting 2 words together (“more cookie,” “no book,” “all done”)

  • Uses one-to-two word questions such as  “go bye bye?” or “where mommy?”

  • Uses a variety of nouns (e.g. mom, dog) and verbs (e.g. eat, sleep)


2-3 years old

  • Participates in play with another person for 1 minute while using appropriate eye contact

  • Repeats words spoken by others

  • Has a word for almost everything

  • Speaks in two-three word sentences

  • Asks what or where questions (e.g. “what’s that?”)

  • Ask yes and no questions

  • Will add “no” in front of verbs to refuse activities (e.g. “no go”)

  • Imitates turn-taking in games or social routines

Activities to Try at Home:

  • Games. Simple turn-taking games help children learn how to wait and take turns which is a necessary skill in conversations. Fun toddler games include Let’s Go Fishin’, Seek-a-boo, and Hi Ho Cherry-O.

  • Expand sentences. Imitate your child’s speech and add on extra words to make it grammatically correct. For instance, if you child says “more juice”, you can repeat “I want more juice”.


Preschool

  • 3-4 years old

    • Names objects in photographs

    • Uses words for a variety of reasons (requests, labels, repetition, help, answers yes/no, attention)

    • Around 3 years, child combines 3-4 words in speech

    • Answers simple who, what, and where questions

    • Uses about 4 sentences at a time

    • Child’s speech can be understood by most adults

    • Asks how, why, and when questions

  • Activities to Try at Home

    • Yes/no game. Make a game out of yes/no questions by asking your child funny questions such as “Is your name Bob?”, “Can you eat dirt?”, “Do you like ice cream?” Then have your child make up silly questions to try to trick you!

    • Ask questions. While running errands, ask your child questions about the community. For instance, “where do we buy food?”, “who helps you when you are sick?”, or “what do you do if it’s raining?”


  • 4-5 years old

    • When given a description, child can name the described object. For example, “What is round and bounces?”

    • Answers questions logically. For example, “what do you do if you are tired?”

    • Uses possessives (the girl’s, the boy’s)

    • Tells a short story

    • Keeps a conversation going

    • Talks in different ways depending on the place or listener


  • Activities to Try at Home

    • I-spy. Describe common objects around the house by giving descriptive clues such as what it looks like, what you do with it, where you would find it, etc. Have your child guess what you are talking about! Include objects out of sight to encourage your child to determine objects on their own, and then have them go on a scavenger hunt to find it.

    • Make up stories. Build a blanket fort, grab a flashlight, and create fairy tale stories. Toys may be used as prompts to help make up a story. Incorporate each part of a story including setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end.


School age

  • 5-6 years old

    • Child can tell you what object is and what it’s used for

    • Answers questions about hypothetical events. For example, “What do you do if you get lost?”

    • Uses prepositions (in, on, under, next to, in front of) in sentences

    • Uses the possessives pronouns her and his

    • Names categories of objects such as food, transportation, animals, clothing, and furniture

    • Asks grammatically correct questions

    • Completes analogies. For instance, you sleep in a bed, you sit on a chair

    • Uses qualitative concepts short and long


  • Activities to Try at Home

    • Category games. Name 5, Scattergories, and Hedbanz are fun and engaging games to work on naming categories.

    • Simon says. Play a game of simon says using prepositions. For instance, Simon says put the book on the table. Once your child is familiar with the game, have them be Simon and give directions using prepositions.


  • 6-7 years old

    • Child is able to names letters

    • Answers why questions with a reason

    • Able to rhymes words

    • Repeats longer sentences

    • Able to retell a story

    • Describes similarities between two objects

  • Activities at Home

    • Read rhyming books. Dr. Seuss books are great to teach rhyming. Read a page and have your child identify the words that rhyme.

    • Movies. After watching a movie, have your child summarize the plot. Guide your child by breaking it up into beginning, middle, and end.


If you feel your child is developmentally delayed in his or her expressive language skills, contact Lumiere Children’s Therapy for a speech-language evaluation. Our speech therapists can formally assess your child’s expressive language skills, create age-appropriate goals, and develop a therapeutic program unique to your child’s needs.

Resources:

“Baby Talk: Communicating With Your Baby.” WebMD, WebMD, www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/baby-talk#2.

Expressive Language (Using Words and Language). (n.d.). Retrieved from https://childdevelopment.com.au/areas-of-concern/using-speech/expressive-language-using-words-and-language/

“How to Support Your Child's Communication Skills.” ZERO TO THREE, www.zerotothree.org/resources/302-how-to-support-your-child-s-communication-skills.

Mattingly, R. (2018, September 13). Typical Development. Lecture presented in University of Louisville, Louisville.

Zimmerman, Irla Lee., et al. PLS-5 Preschool Language Scales: Fifth Edition. NCS Pearson, 2011.

Child Therapy: School Therapy

The beginning of the school year may seem overwhelming for parents, with navigating bus schedules, after-school activities, and new classroom expectations. To make the beginning of the year a little less hectic, we answered all your questions about the IEP process as well as  taking a look at speech therapy services in the school.

What is an IEP?

An IEP, Individualized Education Program, is a legal document for each child in public school who qualifies for special educational services. The IEP documentation process is a team approach consisting of caregivers, classroom teacher, special education teacher, and specialized therapists (speech therapist, occupational therapist, vision therapist, psychologist, etc). The IEP outlines the appropriate and necessary special educational services available to your child to help them become most successful in the classroom.

 

What is included in an IEP?

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a federal law requiring specific information in the IEP, but does not mandate a specific format. Therefore, each IEP may look different depending on the involved professionals and school district. The main purpose of the IEP is to outline the necessary support and services provided to your child inside and outside classroom instruction. It includes the type, amount, and frequency of services. An IEP will include the following information:

 

  • Current performance level. The IEP will outline your child’s strengths and weaknesses academically, socially and behaviorally. If appropriate, it will include an analysis on language and speech development, sensory needs, fine motor development and gross motor development. Standardized assessments will be explained with scores and severity level. Each member of the IEP team will communicate specific information about their area of expertise such as progression with current goals, strengths and weaknesses, and type of support provided.

 

  • Measurable goals. The second piece of information included in an IEP is the goals. Goals are created based on your child’s current needs. Goals are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely. Progress on goals should be observed and documented throughout the year by the attending professional. During annual IEP meetings, goals will be modified, upgraded, and downgraded based on your child’s progress.

 

  • Appropriate services. The final piece of information included in an IEP is the action plan, such as recommended services, start date, location (in classroom or out of classroom), and professionals involved. Services may include extended testing time, reading intervention, speech therapy 1x/week, qualification for a communication device, and so on. The type, frequency, and implementation of services will be specific to your child’s needs.

 

What should you expect in an IEP meeting?

 

IEP meetings occur annually to discuss progress, concerns, and make necessary updates. If necessary, IEP meetings can occur more than once a year to discuss changes or modifications to the current plan. Prior to the annual meeting, team members will re-evaluate skills through standardized and/or non-standardized assessments, observe behaviors and participation in the classroom and analyze data collected on goals.

The new IEP is written with updated goals and services. The annual IEP meeting will be scheduled in advance to ensure each member of the team is present. During the meeting, each team professional will communicate progress and modifications of current goals and services. After each member of the team has discussed their area of specialty, caregivers will be able to discuss current concerns observed at home. In preparation of the meeting, write down noticeable areas of improvement and weaknesses to discuss during the meeting.

The meeting may seem overwhelming with excess amounts of educational jargon, so being prepared with specific questions or concerns will ensure you have all your questions answered. If you feel rushed during the initial or annual meeting, feel free to ask for a copy of the IEP to review at home before signing off on the current plan. Once you are comfortable with the current plan for services, your signature will allow for the IEP to become effective.

 

Speech Therapy in School

 

In order to determine eligibility for speech therapy services through the school, the speech therapist must obey the federal regulations of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).  Eligibility is determined through a multi-step process including observation, teacher reports, screening, standardized assessments, work samples, and parent reports.

The speech-language pathologist will determine if there is a language or speech disorder. In order for the child to receive services in school, the disability must be adversely affecting educational performance. The following can be used to determine adverse academic impact: teacher’s reports, work samples, grade and therapist’s observations in the classroom. Due to caseload capacities, mild speech and language disorders may not qualify for services in the school. If you are concerned with your child’s speech and language development but your child does not qualify for services in the school, you may obtain services through a private practice.

If your child qualifies for speech therapy services, it is important to establish a good rapport with the speech-language pathologist. Parent involvement is crucial for carryover of skills into the home environment. Below are questions to ask your speech therapist in the beginning of each school year.

 

5 Questions to ask your speech therapist:

 

1. What will be the type of service?

 

There are two types of service methods: push-in or pull-out. Push-in is providing speech services in the classroom. The speech therapist collaborates with the teachers and classroom staff. This method allows the speech therapist to target social interactions within the classroom setting. Therapy in the classroom is most beneficial for children demonstrating difficulty with participation in the classroom. It is a great way to work on social skills, reading comprehension, or other language goals that may be impacting one’s academic success. Benefits include peer models, not missing instructional time, collaboration between classroom staff, and addressing specific academic concerns. Disadvantages include classroom distraction and limited one-on-one instruction.

Pull-out method performs speech therapy in the designated speech room. Services may be conducted in a group or individual setting. Pull-out method is recommended for children with articulation goals or specific language concerns. Advantages of pull-out allows specific instruction and intervention in a small group setting. The lesson can be child-specific and independent from the classroom curriculum of that day. The disadvantages of pull-out is that the child is taken away from peer models and may be pulled out during classroom instruction.

 

2. What will be the group size?

 

Group size varies depending on grade, speech goals and time of day. Most school groups fluctuate between three to five students in a group.

 

3. How will be the groups be divided?

 

Groups can be divided in a variety of ways: grade level, type of speech therapy (articulation, language, social), or ability level. Knowing how the group is divided is important to make sure your child is receiving the adequate amount of personalized instruction.

 

4. What will the weekly schedule be?

 

Each school speech therapist creates their weekly schedule differently. It is important to know how often and the amount of time your child will be receiving services. Will it be once a week for 20-30 minutes or three times a week for 15 minute increments.

 

5. What are the goals of therapy?

 

This is the most important question to ask your speech therapist. The speech therapist will have long term goals for the length of the IEP, as well as short term goals she/he will be targeting during sessions. Ask the therapist what goals to work on at home to facilitate carryover into the home environment.

 

For more information on speech therapy services outside school, contact Lumiere Children’s Therapy at 312.242.1665 or www.lumierechild.com.

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Resources:

School Services Frequently Asked Questions. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.asha.org/slp/schools/school-services-Frequently-Asked-questions/#ed2

School-Based Service Delivery in Speech-Language Pathology. (n.d.). Retrieved August 14, 2018, from https://www.asha.org/SLP/schools/School-Based-Service-Delivery-in-Speech-Language-Pathology/

Baumel, J. (n.d.). What is an IEP? Retrieved August 14, 2018, from https://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/what-is-an-iep/