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Picture Exchange Communication System - Lumiere Children’s Therapy Chicago

Our previous post, Learning to Talk, outlined the typical development pattern for expressive language. Expressive language is the ability for one to communicate wants and needs, socialize, and interact with their environment through words, gestures, and nonverbal communication. For children with a language delay or an expressive language disorder secondary to an underlying diagnosis, a picture exchange system may assist in the development of expressive language. The picture exchange system can offer a bridge between communicating with gestures or signs to verbal communication. It may also help a child develop the necessary skills to operate a high tech Augmentative Alternative Communication Device (AAC).

Picture Exchange Communication System, often referred to as PECS, is a program of picture representations for common objects, actions, and thoughts. A person can initiate conversation using PECS to communicate their wants and needs without verbally speaking. It allows children to communicate with others even if they do not have the necessary verbal skills.



What is Picture Exchange Communication System?

Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) was developed by Andy Bondy, PhD, and Lori Frost, MS, CCC-SLP in 1985 as a system used with preschool students diagnosed with autism. The goal of the program was to teach children how to self-initiate functional communication. Based on the success of the program, it is used with many learners with various communicative, cognitive, and physical difficulties of all ages. PECS is a six phase program that emerges from single word requests to building of sentence structures. There have been several studies that confirm that implementing PECS can help children develop verbal language, as well as decrease negative behaviors associated with language delays.



Who would be appropriate for PECS?

PECs is an approach used for nonverbal children. If your child consistently uses words, although limited, this system may not be the first choice in treatment. The following would indicate if your child would be a good candidate for a picture exchange system. 

  • Intentional communicator: In order to effectively use a communicate exchange, a child needs to want to communicate with others either through pointing, gestures, bringing caregivers to desired objects, or communicate through facial expression. 

    • Example: Jenny wants a chocolate chip cookies, so she directs dad into the kitchen and points to the cabinet with cookies. 

    • If a child does not involve the caregiver when trying to obtain an object, they may not be ready for a picture exchange program. The first step in this scenario would be to gain joint attention. Joint attention is when the child and caregiver are actively focused on the same object/activity. 

  • Preferences/motivation.  In order to understand the power of a picture exchange system, the child needs to be fully motivated for what they are receiving in return. When first teaching PECs, food, favorite toys, and motivating activities (slide, swing, etc) are most frequently used as motivation to communicate through pictures.

    • Example: Eric loves to build with legos. Parent will hold box of legos and give Eric one lego after every request. Eric is motivated to continue to use PECS to get more lego pieces. 

    • If a child has weak or no preferences, then PECs may not be appropriate. Preferences can be determined through trial and error of different foods, toys, and activities.

  • Discrimination of picture. Although picture discrimination is not a definite prerequisite of picture exchange system, it can enhance progress. As PECs continues to be implemented into daily routines, children will begin to learn which pictures correspond with the matching toys, food, activities, etc. If a child advances quickly with PECS, they may be more appropriate for an AAC high tech device. 



How is PECS implemented?

PECs is taught by a certified, trained speech language pathologist (SLP) but involves a caregiver or teacher as part of the team. The SLP becomes certified in PECS by attending a two day training. The SLP will be the primary PECS program coordinator for a child but it can be beneficial if caregivers attend the two-day training as well. Caregivers may include parents/family members, classroom teachers, and classroom assistants. Here is a list of training workshops available across states. PECS can be taught by the SLP in a therapy clinic, home setting with early intervention, and/or school or daycare. As the child and parent progresses in their knowledge and training of PECs, it should be used in all activities in their everyday activities. During phase stage, the goal is approximately 80 picture exchanges each day. 



Stages of PECS: 

In the early stages of PECs, there are three people in the training situation. The child, the person who receives the pictures (mom or teacher), and the facilitator who assists the child (speech therapist). Eventually, the facilitator is phased out of the training. 

  • PECS PHASE I: How to Communicate 

The first phase lays the foundation for exchanging single pictures for desired toys or activities. Receiver entices the child with the preferred object or food. As the child reaches for the desired object, the facilitator can assist the child to pick up the picture and hand to the receiver. The receiver does not say anything until receiving the picture. Once they receive the picture, they can say “ball, you want ball”.

  • PECS PHASE II: Distance and Persistence 

Phase II continues to target single pictures but in a variety of places, communication partners, and at greater distances from their field of view. It also teaches the child to become more persistent and consistent with communicating wants and needs. The facilitator is still present, and intervenes when necessary, but the child should be more independent in this stage.

  • PECS PHASE III: Picture Discrimination 

In this phase, two or more pictures are used at a time. The caregiver would present two or more pictures for a child to choose their desired object. The pictures are compiled into a communication book such as a ring binder for easy access by the child. 

  • PECS PHASE IV: Sentence Structure

The child learns to construct simple sentences with a sentence strip using “I want” picture with desired picture following.

  • PECS PHASE V: Answering Questions 

At this point, the child can learn to use PECS to answer questions such as “What do you want to play?” or “What do you want to eat”. 

  • PECS PHASE VI: Commenting 

The final phase of PECS is using pictures to make comments or respond to questions in their environment. They learn to create sentences starting with functional phrase strips I see, I hear, I feel, It is a, etc. 



How does PECs help develop verbal language?

In the previous post, Learning to Talk, a list of seven prerequisites to verbal language were described with at-home strategies. Three of the prerequisites align with the foundation of a picture exchange system. 

  1. Adequate attention and joint attention. Joint attention is when a child is focused on the same item or activity as the communicator or parent.

    1. Joint attention is necessary for a child to understand the concept of PECs. PECs requires the child to establish joint attention between the communication partner and their desired object or action. 

  2. Understands words and commands. 

    1. Before a child can effectively use verbal language, they need adequate receptive language skills. Receptive language is the ability to understand and comprehend language. Receptive language involves the identification of pictures. PECs encourages children to identify an action or object with a corresponding picture. It increases the child’s recognition and labeling of common objects and actions, improving one’s receptive language skills. 

  3. Communicates wants and needs with gestures and/or pointing. Children learn to communicate and engage with caregivers before verbal language typically emerges. Children may smile when they get something they want, point towards desired objects, or carry toys to caregiver. These are all forms of expressive language. PECs helps facilitate non-verbal expressive language by giving the child resources to communicate wants and needs to caregivers. It teaches the concept that requesting for an object/action results in receiving desired item. PECS encourages the concept of cause and effect. 



As a child develops these necessary skills through a picture exchange system, they are reinforcing the development of communicating for wants and needs. The caregiver is modeling the verbal production of each picture exchange providing more opportunities for modeling. For example, if Noah brings a picture of a ball to his mom, mom will state “ball, want ball”. Noah is receiving verbal modeling of the word ball to picture multiple times. 

If you feel your child would be an appropriate candidate for a picture exchange system, contact Lumiere Children’s Therapy. At Lumiere Children’s Therapy, we have therapist certified in the program to help your child communicate their wants and needs across all environments.




References:

“Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)® |.” Pyramid Educational Consultants, pecsusa.com/pecs/.

“The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS).” The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS), www.nationalautismresources.com/the-picture-exchange-communication-system-pecs/.

Vicker, B. (2002). What is the Picture Exchange communication System or PECS? The Reporter, 7(2), 1-4, 11.




Lumiere Children's Therapy Chicago: Mastering Gross Motor Milestones

Reaching and mastering gross motor skill milestones, is vital for proper child development. The following explains the five sequential milestones (tummy time, rolling, sitting, crawling and walking) and tips to help your child achieve them.

David Precious

David Precious

Tummy Time

Tummy time is important for your child to develop strength in his neck muscles. Neck muscle strength is important for your child to begin holding his head upright and in the middle, and contributes to his ability to roll over, sit, crawl and walk.

If your child seems fussy on their tummy, this is because it is a difficult position for your child. It is similar to an adult version of a plank— very difficult! Tummy time looks different each month of development, depending on your child’s age and level of strength, call Lumiere Children’s Therapy or attend one of our parent trainings to learn more about developmental positions and motor milestones.

Where can I do tummy time?

You can do tummy time on a blanket or foam mat on the floor, over your chest facing you while you are laying down, over your lap or carrying the child on his/her tummy across your forearms.

What should my baby look like in tummy time?

Tummy time looks different at each month of age. Initially in the first month, your baby will barely be able to lift his head off the surface to rest his cheek. Then, closer to 3-4 months you child will be able to lift his up further and further until it is at a right angle to his back. By 5-6 months, your child will start to push up on his hands with straight elbow. Then, it’s time to start pivoting and belly crawling.

Tummy Time Tips

  • Always supervise your child during tummy time. Get on the floor with your child so he/she is motivated to lift his/her head

  • Use a mirror, rattles, music-playing toys, or bubbles

  • Sing to your child during tummy time

  • Begin tummy time early on, as early as a week old!

  • Start in 2-5 minute increments and work your way up to total 60 minutes a day.

  • Perform exercises when your baby is the most energized and ready to play, such as after your baby has slept, eaten, and has a clean diaper, to ensure your baby is the best mood to “exercise”!

  • Note: some babies will need to wait an hour after eating before tummy time to minimize spitting up, especially babies with reflux. Ask your doctor about specifics if your baby has reflux.

  • Use a fun tummy time mat a comfortable tummy time mat will motivate your baby to stay on his tummy, engage in the toy, and be comfortable! Fisher-Price Deluxe Kick 'n Play Piano Gym or a water mat will also motivate your baby to perform tummy time! Hoovy Baby Inflatable Water Play Mat


Rolling

When should my baby be rolling?

Babies typically roll from back to belly around 4-6 months, and belly to back ~3-5 months. However, this is a range, and every child is different!

How can I help my baby roll?

There are a few fun activities that you can do with your baby to encourage rolling:

  • Reaching for feet: Rolling from back to belly requires quite a bit of core strength, so a great place to start is by encouraging your child to reach for his feet to really engage his core muscles.  You can do this by placing rings on your child’s feet to encourage him to reach up towards his feet to grab the rings. You may have to help him at first, but once he is able to do so let him do it more and more on his own until he does it on his own.

  • Reaching to one side: With your child on their back, use a toy to guide your child to look to one side and encourage him to reach for the toy by reaching across his body and rolling to his side. Sometimes you have to move the toy farther than you think to get him to reach!

  • Assisted rolling: Once your baby is reaching across his body for a toy, you can help your baby to his side by assisting at his hip. This helps teach him how to complete the motion with both his upper and lower body together. As he continues to gain strength, you can gradually decrease your support until he rolls on his own!  

  • Tummy time: The more comfortable and strong your baby is in tummy time, the more your baby will want to roll and tolerate floor time. Read above for tips on tummy time!

When and why would my baby need physical therapy to help with rolling?

Babies are all different and can develop at slightly different times, and that is okay! If your baby is showing any of the following “red flags” listed below, it might be a good idea to ask a physical therapist for an evaluation. (However, these are child specific. Call our and ask to speak with a physical therapist with any questions):

  • Not reaching with arms for toys at 6 months on back

  • Not able to lift head up in tummy time at 3 months

  • Not rolling back to belly by 8 or 9 months

  • Only reaching with one arm

  • Only rolling to one side

Additionally, your child may have another medical diagnosis that will make meeting motor milestones tougher, and a physical therapist can educate parents on treatment ideas and home exercises to teach your baby the motor plan to roll, as well as strengthen muscles!


Sitting

When should my baby be sitting?

Babies can begin prop-sitting while leaning on hands as early as 4 months, however while having a caregiver close by to assist with balance. Babies typically can sit on their own between 6-8 months. However, this is a range, and every child is different!


How can I help my baby sit?

There are a few fun activities that you can do with your baby to encourage sitting:

  • Prop-sitting: Hold your child around his trunk and help him lean forward onto his arms. At first, your child may only be able to do this for a few seconds at a time, but it builds arm strength! Work up to 30 seconds, then 1-2 minutes at a time, to your child’s tolerance. At first, your child will place his hands in front of his feet (around 4 months). As your child gets stronger, his arms will move closer to his knees (around 5 months), then hips, then he may place his hands on his own legs until he can sit without his arms (around 6-7 months). As your child gains strength, continue to sit close by and assist your child as needed.

  • Assisted sitting: Hold you child around his trunk and decrease your assist until your child can sit on his own. You can place toys directly in front of him to encourage him to sit up straight and lean his hands on a toy if needed.

Note: Babies do not gain the reflex to catch themselves on their arm from falling sideways until 6-7 months, and they do not gain the reflect to catch themselves on their arm from falling backwards until 10 months. Always be nearby and ready to catch your child from falling when practicing sitting exercises.

  • Tummy time: Similar to rolling, the more comfortable and strong your baby is in tummy time, the more your baby will have the core strength to sit. Read Part 1 for more tips on tummy time!



Toys for sitting

Cube activity Center: A vertical surface such as a large cube is great to provide some support for your child to place his hands on, and also encourage an upright trunk. Check it out here

Shape Sorter: A larger type toy is helpful to provide some support for your child to put his hands on as he learns to sit. Once he is sitting on his own, it encourages reaching and manipulating toys to further challenge balance in sitting. Check it out here


When and why would my baby need physical therapy to help with sitting?

Babies are all different and can develop at slightly different times, and that is okay! If your baby is showing any of the following “red flags” listed below, it might be a good idea to ask a physical therapist for an evaluation. (However, these are child specific. Call our and ask to speak with a physical therapist with any questions):

  • Not able to sit on his own by 8 months reach for toys on belly at 7 or 8 months

  • Not able to prop-sit while leaning on his hands by 7-8 months

  • Not able to sit upright when he sits (leaning to one side)

Additionally, your child may have another medical diagnosis that will make meeting motor milestones tougher, and a physical therapist can educate parents on treatment ideas and home exercises to teach your baby the balance to sit, as well as strengthen muscles!

Crawling

When should my baby be crawling?

Babies typically begin pivoting in a circle on their belly around 6-7 months, belly crawling forward on their belly between 7-9 months, and crawling forward on hands and knees around 8-10 months. However, this is a range, and every child is different!

How can I help my baby crawl?

There are a few fun activities that you can do with your baby to encourage crawling:

  • Sitting to belly: Once your child is able to sit on their own, its time to start introducing weight shifting to transition to his stomach. To do this,  start in sitting and you can lean your child to one side to lean on one arm while reaching towards a toy with his opposite arm. Then guide him up and over his leg and onto his belly.  Make sure to have him go over his side to protect his hips. This strengthens his arms and core and helps them learn how to shift his weight from side to side.

  • Kneeling at a surface: Next, help him kneel at a surface or a a low step to encourage weight-bearing on his knees in a modified crawling position. This a great place to practice lifting one arm to reach for a toy, to simulate reaching forward on all fours when crawling.

  • Rocking on all fours: You can also help him rock on all fours to help them slowly build strength in his core and arms. As he begins to get into all fours on his own (typically anywhere from 5-9 months) you can provide support at his trunk and legs to help him rock back and forth. Once he gets stronger, you can support his trunk and help him crawl forward as he moves his arms.

  • Tummy time: Similar to rolling and sitting, the more comfortable and strong your baby is in tummy time, the more your baby will want to pivot and crawl! Read Part 1 for more tips on tummy time!

When and why would my baby need physical therapy to help with crawling?

Babies are all different and can develop at slightly different times, and that is okay! If your baby is showing any of the following “red flags” listed below, it might be a good idea to ask a physical therapist for an evaluation. (However, these are child specific. Call our and ask to speak with a physical therapist with any questions):

  • Not able to reach for toys on belly at 7 or 8 months

  • Not trying to pivot on belly or move position on belly at 7-8 months

  • Not rolling back to belly by 8 or 9 months

  • Only reaching with one arm

  • Only rolling to one side

Additionally, your child may have another medical diagnosis that will make meeting motor milestones tougher, and a physical therapist can educate parents on treatment ideas and home exercises to teach your baby the motor plan to crawl, as well as strengthen muscles!


Walking

When should my baby be walking?

Babies can begin walking between 10-14 months. However, this is a range, every child is different, and this depends on their motor milestone acquisition thus far!

How can I help my baby walk?

There are a few fun activities that you can do with your baby to encourage walking. Always stand close by with your hands out during such exercises to catch your child from falling if necessary:

  • Assisted cruising: Once your child is able to pull to stand and stand at a support surface, you can start teaching him to move on his feet by stepping sideways to cruise along a table, coffee table, or ottoman. The surface can be about the height of your child’s chest. Once he has mastered cruising, you can encourage larger steps by having him cruise between two support surfaces at a 90 or 180 degree angle. Gradually, you can increase the distance between the surfaces to make it more challenging.

  • Reaching in standing: Walking incorporates both balance and coordination, and a great way to target this is by practicing weight shifting while standing. You can start by having your child stand with his back against a couch or wall, and practice reaching forward or sideways. You can do this by having him reach for a toy or pop bubbles, whatever interests him. You can also have him hold onto the toy as you for another way to help him gain balance in standing with decreased assistance.

  • Walking practice: Practice taking steps by holding your child around his trunk and walking/kneeling behind them. This promotes proper alignment while walking.  When your child can stand on his own >20-30 seconds at at time, he is likely ready to start taking steps. Stand a few feet away from him to encourage him to walk to you. You can start by holding his hand, or holding the same toy, then fade assist as he gains strength and confidence!

  • Squatting: When your child can stand at a surface, hold objects at the height of his knee to encourage him to bend down and pick up an object, then return to standing. Both knees should bend, and this strengthens his muscles! As he gets stronger, you can hold the object lower and lower until the object is on the floor. Make sure to do this to both sides.

  • Tummy time: Similar to rolling, the more comfortable and strong your baby is in tummy time, the more your baby will have the core strength to sit. Read Part 1 for more tips on tummy time!

Walking tips

  • Start with your child barefoot so your child can feel the ground and use his toes for balance.

  • Use positive praise and get excited for your child so he stays positive!

  • Use bubbles or a fun toy to distract him!

  • Note: Some children may need some support in their shoes to add some stability to assist in standing and walking. A physical therapist can assess your child’s foot alignment to determine if an insert or brace is indicated.


When and why would my baby need physical therapy to help with walking?

Babies are all different and can develop at slightly different times, and that is okay! If your baby is showing any of the following “red flags” listed below, it might be a good idea to ask a physical therapist for an evaluation. (However, these are child specific. Call our and ask to speak with a physical therapist with any questions):

  • Not standing at a surface by 12-14 months

  • Not cruising along a surface at 16 months

  • Refusing to bear weight through legs at 10 months

  • Standing/cruising on tip-toes

Additionally, your child may have another medical diagnosis that will make meeting motor milestones tougher, and a physical therapist can educate parents on treatment ideas and home exercises to give your baby strength and confidence to walk!

Thank you for reading our motor milestone series! If this blog post has sparked any questions about your child’s development, feel free to call our office to speak to a physical therapist! We also offer two “mom and tot” classes about teaching your child to move, listed below. Call our office at 312.242.1665 to try a class!



PARENT/TOT CLASSES

BUDDING BABIES* (ages 4-10 months)

Your baby may not be crawling yet but there’s lots they’re learning – and you can help! Learn how to position your baby to build strength and develop stability. Explore the senses and support visual and auditory development with tummy time, rolling and other key exercises. This class includes parent discussion time to help learn about your child's development.

*Parent Involvement Required

WEE WALKERS* (ages 11-22 months)

As your baby becomes vertical, a whole new world of wonder is revealed. Play environments are vital to encourage discovery, problem solving, balance and coordination. Parents learn to understand how their infant interacts and communicates with them and others.

*Parent Involvement Required

www.lumierechild.com

Lumiere Children’s Therapy: Breathing Difficulties in Children

Examine your breathing for a minute. Are you breathing through your nose or mouth? Is your mouth open or closed? Is your tongue on the bottom or roof of your mouth? Optimal breathing should be effortless and quiet through the nostrils with the tongue suctioned to the roof of the mouth behind the front teeth and the lips should be gently closed. Nasal breathing positively affects swallowing patterns, chewing, speaking, voicing and body posture. If nasal breathing is compromised for any reason, orofacial myofunctional disorders and/or airway function disorders may arise. This article focuses on descriptions of airway function disorders, including pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, and treatment options.

Airway Function Disorders (AFD)

AFD occur when the airway function is obstructed at any level of the airway, affecting a range of human functions. Sleep disorder breathing such as pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, is a collapse at any level of the upper airway resulting in abnormal breathing during sleep. Pediatric sleep apnea will be discussed further in this article. Sleep disordered breathing is initially impacted by daytime breathing specifically in children who mouth breath.

Signs of mouth breathing include the following:

  • Open lips

  • Low or forward tongue posture

  • Short upper lip

  • Forward head posture (protruding from neck)

  • Frequently dry lips

  • Misaligned teeth requiring orthodontics

  • Dry mouth

  • Hyponasal speech (speech that sounds nasal like they have a cold)

  • Drooling

  • Nasal congestion or constant runny nose


Impact of AFD

Airway function disorders may impact a variety of functions in a child’s life. It may interfere with language development, learning and academics, memory, attention, socialization, and self-regulation. Children with AFD may exhibit primary behavior characteristics of excessive fidgeting, hyperactivity, decreased attention and emotional outburst.

airway

AFD may also impact a child’s speech and swallow function. Some children with AFD present with an interdentalized (tongue between teeth) on the following sounds /s, z, t, d, n, l/ as those sounds are produced with tongue elevation.  Children may also experience abnormal swallowing patterns such as tongue-thrust swallows or impaired chewing.


Risk factors of AFD

The following is a list of risk factors associated with AFD:

  • Enlarged tonsils and/or adenoids

  • Mouth breathing

  • Nasal abnormalities such as a deviated septum (Deviated septum is when the thin wall between nasal passages is displaced causing one nasal passage to be smaller)

  • Frequent nasal congestion or allergies

  • Chronic rhinitis: set of symptoms including running nose, itchy nose, post-nasal drip, congestion, and sneezing that persist for months to a year

  • Higher Body Mass Index

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): when stomach acid flows back up irritating the lining of the esophagus

  • Low muscle tone

  • Craniofacial syndromes or growth alteration

  • Prematurity

  • Traumatic birth

  • Gender (Males are two times more likely to have SBD)

  • Ethnicity (African Americans are at a higher risk)

Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

Reflect on your quality of sleep the past few nights. Did you sleep soundly through the night without any disturbances and wake up rejuvenated, or did you toss and turn all night feeling distracted and lethargic in the morning? The quality and effectiveness of a good night’s sleep impacts your mood and productivity the following day. The same holds true for children; if a child experiences disturbances throughout the night, they may demonstrate difficulties in behavior and attention during the school day. Studies have suggested that as many as 25% of children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder may have symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea.

What is OSA?

OSA is an airway function disorder that is observed during sleep. OSA is when a person has repeated episodes of partial or complete upper-airway obstruction during sleep

How prevalent is OSA in children?

Studies have shown that up to 5% of children are diagnosed with OSA, with a correction between pediatric obesity and OSA.

What are the symptoms of OSA?

The most prevalent symptom of OSA is snoring. Although some children may only demonstrate habitual snoring which consists of vibration of airway tissue with no airway obstruction, studies have found a ratio between 3:1 and 5:1 between symptomatic habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Other symptoms include the following:

  • Agitated sleep

  • Nightmares

  • Mouth breathing or open mouth posture

  • Bedwetting

  • Pauses in breathing or gasping for air during sleep

  • Audible breathing

  • Grinding teeth

  • Sweating

Treatment for Airway Disorders

  1. The first step to treatment of airway disorders is to determine the function of the nasal airway. Determining structural or physiological barriers to nasal breathing is necessary to determine plan of care. An evaluation by an allergist and otolaryngologist (ENT) is necessary to determine if medications such as antihistamines, allergy medicine or surgery is required to be able to safely breath out of the mouth.

  2. Elimination of non-nutritive sucking is important for adequate growth and formation of dental structures. Non-nutritive sucking (e.g. pacifier, finger, and object sucking) is a risk factor for future dental occlusion abnormalities. Orofacial myofunctional therapist can provide strategies to eliminate the use of nonnutritive sucking.

  3. Establishing adequate oral rest posture would be the next step of therapy. Orofacial myofunctional therapy focuses on retraining the muscles to stabilize a normal rest posture between the tongue, lips, teeth and jaw. Orofacial myofunctional therapy uses oral tactile stimulation and resistance activities to help disassociate the tongue from the jaw, improve lip closure and strengthen tongue elevation.

  4. Once the resting posture has been achieved, orthodontics may be recommended for dental stability if the child presents with a malocclusion of crossbite, overjet, or underbite; this might include braces, retainer, or rapid palatal expansion depending on the occlusion.

Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment

In cases of pediatric sleep apnea, the first treatment step is typically the removal of the adenoids and tonsils. As reported by American Sleep Apnea Association, the removal of the adenoids and tonsils results in complete elimination of pediatric OSA symptoms in 70-90% of uncomplicated cases. As previously mentioned, a dental evaluation should be performed to check for hard palate development to accommodate the child's tongue. If necessary a rapid palatal expander (a non-invasive fixed and/or removable dental device) can be worn for six months to one year, to expand the transverse diameter of the hard palate.The next treatment option to consider is positive airway pressure, or PAP, which is typically used as a palliative treatment for adults with sleep apnea. A PAP machine blows pressurized air into the child’s mouth to counteract the closing of the throat during sleep. The amount of pressure is determined through an overnight sleep study.

If you feel your child exhibits any of the symptoms listed above for an airway function disorder, speak with your primary care physician for adequate referrals to airway specialists. At Lumiere Children’s Therapy, our speech-language pathologist can treat speech sound disorders, swallowing disorders, and oral motor deficits associated with AFD.

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References:

Archambault, N. (n.d.). Healthy Breathing, 'Round the Clock. Retrieved from https://leader.pubs.asha.org/doi/full/10.1044/leader.FTR1.23022018.48


Capdevila, O. S., Kheirandish-Gozal, L., Dayyat, E., & Gozal, D. (2008). Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea: complications, management, and long-term outcomes. Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society, 5(2), 274-82.

Children's Sleep Apnea. (2017, February 13). Retrieved from https://www.sleepapnea.org/treat/childrens-sleep-apnea/

Deviated septum. (2018, March 03). Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/deviated-septum/symptoms-causes/syc-20351710

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (2018, March 09). Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gerd/symptoms-causes/syc-20361940

Hayes, K. (n.d.). Coping With Chronic Rhinitis. Retrieved from https://www.verywellhealth.com/coping-with-chronic-rhinitis-4160487

Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders: Treatment. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.asha.org/PRPSpecificTopic.aspx?folderid=8589943975§ion=Treatment

Positive Airway Pressure Therapy for Sleep Apnea. (2017, February 03). Retrieved from https://www.sleepapnea.org/treat/sleep-apnea-treatment-options/positive-airway-pressure-therapy/


Child Speech Therapy: Expressive Language Skills

Hearing your child’s voice for the first time is an exciting, monumental part of parenthood. As the first babbles turn into words, and eventually sentences, your child’s expressive language is developing. Receptive language is the ability to understand language, as expressive language is the ability to use words, sentences, gestures, and writing to communicate with others.

What is expressive language and why is it important?

Expressive language allows a person to communicate wants, needs, thoughts and opinions. Expressive language is the ability to request objects, make choices, ask questions, answer, and describe events. Speaking, gesturing (waving, pointing), writing (texting, emailing), facial expressions (crying, smiling), and vocalizations (crying, yelling) are all variations of expressive language. Children with poor expressive language skills may become frustrated when they cannot communicate their wants and needs. Temper tantrums may occur when they feel tired, sick or hungry and cannot express their current needs.

How do expressive language skills develop?

Expressive language is developed within the first few days after birth. Babies learn to communicate when they are hungry, uncomfortable or tired through crying and facial expressions. They learn to laugh when they are enjoying an interaction with a parent or caregiver, and smile when they are happy. These are all forms of communication. In order for expressive language skills to develop, a child also needs to have strong receptive language, attention, play, social pragmatics and motivation.

  • Receptive language skills is the comprehension of language which is an underlying skill to label objects, answer questions appropriately, and use language in the intended way.

  • Adequate attention skills is an underlying skill for all developmental tasks. The ability to sustain attention is important in order to finish one’s thought and effectively communicate to others.

  • Play skills encourage children to explore their surroundings. Play can be an intrinsic motivator for young children to communicate by requesting, interacting, and labeling toys.

  • Pragmatic skills is the way language is used day to day in social situations. Adequate pragmatic skills allows a person to participate in conversation appropriately.

Expressive Language Milestones & Activities:

The following, outlines expressive language milestones from birth to 7 years old in three categories: birth, preschool, and school age. Learn about the typical developmental stages as well as activities to try at home.

Birth- 3 years old

  • 0-1 years old:

    • Produces pleasure sounds (cooing and gooing)

    • Makes noises when talked to

    • Protests or rejects through gestures or vocalizations

    • Cries differently for different intentions

    • Attempts to imitate facial expressions and movements of caregivers

    • Laughs during parent interaction

    • Between 7-12 months, child will start to babble sounds together (mama, dada)

    • Uses a representational gesture (such as waves bye-bye, claps hands, moves body)

  • Activities to Try at Home:

    • Talk to your child. When your child is developing language, they learn through role models. Talk to your child about your day, what you are doing, and what they can see. It may feel strange at first to talk to your baby without them responding, but the more you talk, the more they learn.

    • Read. It is never too early to start reading books to your child. Point out familiar pictures in the books. If you are reading about animals, make the animal sounds associated with each animal.  

    • Imitate. Imitate all sounds, gestures, and facial expressions your child makes. Repeat a noise they make, and wait for a response. Encouraging imitation can help your child participate in social turn-taking and start to imitate your words.


1-2 years old

  • First words develop around 12 -14 months (hi, mama, dad)

  • Takes turns vocalizing with another person

  • Uses at least two different consonant sounds (early signs include p, b, t, d, m)

  • Around 18-24 months, child begins putting 2 words together (“more cookie,” “no book,” “all done”)

  • Uses one-to-two word questions such as  “go bye bye?” or “where mommy?”

  • Uses a variety of nouns (e.g. mom, dog) and verbs (e.g. eat, sleep)


2-3 years old

  • Participates in play with another person for 1 minute while using appropriate eye contact

  • Repeats words spoken by others

  • Has a word for almost everything

  • Speaks in two-three word sentences

  • Asks what or where questions (e.g. “what’s that?”)

  • Ask yes and no questions

  • Will add “no” in front of verbs to refuse activities (e.g. “no go”)

  • Imitates turn-taking in games or social routines

Activities to Try at Home:

  • Games. Simple turn-taking games help children learn how to wait and take turns which is a necessary skill in conversations. Fun toddler games include Let’s Go Fishin’, Seek-a-boo, and Hi Ho Cherry-O.

  • Expand sentences. Imitate your child’s speech and add on extra words to make it grammatically correct. For instance, if you child says “more juice”, you can repeat “I want more juice”.


Preschool

  • 3-4 years old

    • Names objects in photographs

    • Uses words for a variety of reasons (requests, labels, repetition, help, answers yes/no, attention)

    • Around 3 years, child combines 3-4 words in speech

    • Answers simple who, what, and where questions

    • Uses about 4 sentences at a time

    • Child’s speech can be understood by most adults

    • Asks how, why, and when questions

  • Activities to Try at Home

    • Yes/no game. Make a game out of yes/no questions by asking your child funny questions such as “Is your name Bob?”, “Can you eat dirt?”, “Do you like ice cream?” Then have your child make up silly questions to try to trick you!

    • Ask questions. While running errands, ask your child questions about the community. For instance, “where do we buy food?”, “who helps you when you are sick?”, or “what do you do if it’s raining?”


  • 4-5 years old

    • When given a description, child can name the described object. For example, “What is round and bounces?”

    • Answers questions logically. For example, “what do you do if you are tired?”

    • Uses possessives (the girl’s, the boy’s)

    • Tells a short story

    • Keeps a conversation going

    • Talks in different ways depending on the place or listener


  • Activities to Try at Home

    • I-spy. Describe common objects around the house by giving descriptive clues such as what it looks like, what you do with it, where you would find it, etc. Have your child guess what you are talking about! Include objects out of sight to encourage your child to determine objects on their own, and then have them go on a scavenger hunt to find it.

    • Make up stories. Build a blanket fort, grab a flashlight, and create fairy tale stories. Toys may be used as prompts to help make up a story. Incorporate each part of a story including setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end.


School age

  • 5-6 years old

    • Child can tell you what object is and what it’s used for

    • Answers questions about hypothetical events. For example, “What do you do if you get lost?”

    • Uses prepositions (in, on, under, next to, in front of) in sentences

    • Uses the possessives pronouns her and his

    • Names categories of objects such as food, transportation, animals, clothing, and furniture

    • Asks grammatically correct questions

    • Completes analogies. For instance, you sleep in a bed, you sit on a chair

    • Uses qualitative concepts short and long


  • Activities to Try at Home

    • Category games. Name 5, Scattergories, and Hedbanz are fun and engaging games to work on naming categories.

    • Simon says. Play a game of simon says using prepositions. For instance, Simon says put the book on the table. Once your child is familiar with the game, have them be Simon and give directions using prepositions.


  • 6-7 years old

    • Child is able to names letters

    • Answers why questions with a reason

    • Able to rhymes words

    • Repeats longer sentences

    • Able to retell a story

    • Describes similarities between two objects

  • Activities at Home

    • Read rhyming books. Dr. Seuss books are great to teach rhyming. Read a page and have your child identify the words that rhyme.

    • Movies. After watching a movie, have your child summarize the plot. Guide your child by breaking it up into beginning, middle, and end.


If you feel your child is developmentally delayed in his or her expressive language skills, contact Lumiere Children’s Therapy for a speech-language evaluation. Our speech therapists can formally assess your child’s expressive language skills, create age-appropriate goals, and develop a therapeutic program unique to your child’s needs.

Resources:

“Baby Talk: Communicating With Your Baby.” WebMD, WebMD, www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/baby-talk#2.

Expressive Language (Using Words and Language). (n.d.). Retrieved from https://childdevelopment.com.au/areas-of-concern/using-speech/expressive-language-using-words-and-language/

“How to Support Your Child's Communication Skills.” ZERO TO THREE, www.zerotothree.org/resources/302-how-to-support-your-child-s-communication-skills.

Mattingly, R. (2018, September 13). Typical Development. Lecture presented in University of Louisville, Louisville.

Zimmerman, Irla Lee., et al. PLS-5 Preschool Language Scales: Fifth Edition. NCS Pearson, 2011.

Child Therapy: School Therapy

The beginning of the school year may seem overwhelming for parents, with navigating bus schedules, after-school activities, and new classroom expectations. To make the beginning of the year a little less hectic, we answered all your questions about the IEP process as well as  taking a look at speech therapy services in the school.

What is an IEP?

An IEP, Individualized Education Program, is a legal document for each child in public school who qualifies for special educational services. The IEP documentation process is a team approach consisting of caregivers, classroom teacher, special education teacher, and specialized therapists (speech therapist, occupational therapist, vision therapist, psychologist, etc). The IEP outlines the appropriate and necessary special educational services available to your child to help them become most successful in the classroom.

 

What is included in an IEP?

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a federal law requiring specific information in the IEP, but does not mandate a specific format. Therefore, each IEP may look different depending on the involved professionals and school district. The main purpose of the IEP is to outline the necessary support and services provided to your child inside and outside classroom instruction. It includes the type, amount, and frequency of services. An IEP will include the following information:

 

  • Current performance level. The IEP will outline your child’s strengths and weaknesses academically, socially and behaviorally. If appropriate, it will include an analysis on language and speech development, sensory needs, fine motor development and gross motor development. Standardized assessments will be explained with scores and severity level. Each member of the IEP team will communicate specific information about their area of expertise such as progression with current goals, strengths and weaknesses, and type of support provided.

 

  • Measurable goals. The second piece of information included in an IEP is the goals. Goals are created based on your child’s current needs. Goals are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely. Progress on goals should be observed and documented throughout the year by the attending professional. During annual IEP meetings, goals will be modified, upgraded, and downgraded based on your child’s progress.

 

  • Appropriate services. The final piece of information included in an IEP is the action plan, such as recommended services, start date, location (in classroom or out of classroom), and professionals involved. Services may include extended testing time, reading intervention, speech therapy 1x/week, qualification for a communication device, and so on. The type, frequency, and implementation of services will be specific to your child’s needs.

 

What should you expect in an IEP meeting?

 

IEP meetings occur annually to discuss progress, concerns, and make necessary updates. If necessary, IEP meetings can occur more than once a year to discuss changes or modifications to the current plan. Prior to the annual meeting, team members will re-evaluate skills through standardized and/or non-standardized assessments, observe behaviors and participation in the classroom and analyze data collected on goals.

The new IEP is written with updated goals and services. The annual IEP meeting will be scheduled in advance to ensure each member of the team is present. During the meeting, each team professional will communicate progress and modifications of current goals and services. After each member of the team has discussed their area of specialty, caregivers will be able to discuss current concerns observed at home. In preparation of the meeting, write down noticeable areas of improvement and weaknesses to discuss during the meeting.

The meeting may seem overwhelming with excess amounts of educational jargon, so being prepared with specific questions or concerns will ensure you have all your questions answered. If you feel rushed during the initial or annual meeting, feel free to ask for a copy of the IEP to review at home before signing off on the current plan. Once you are comfortable with the current plan for services, your signature will allow for the IEP to become effective.

 

Speech Therapy in School

 

In order to determine eligibility for speech therapy services through the school, the speech therapist must obey the federal regulations of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).  Eligibility is determined through a multi-step process including observation, teacher reports, screening, standardized assessments, work samples, and parent reports.

The speech-language pathologist will determine if there is a language or speech disorder. In order for the child to receive services in school, the disability must be adversely affecting educational performance. The following can be used to determine adverse academic impact: teacher’s reports, work samples, grade and therapist’s observations in the classroom. Due to caseload capacities, mild speech and language disorders may not qualify for services in the school. If you are concerned with your child’s speech and language development but your child does not qualify for services in the school, you may obtain services through a private practice.

If your child qualifies for speech therapy services, it is important to establish a good rapport with the speech-language pathologist. Parent involvement is crucial for carryover of skills into the home environment. Below are questions to ask your speech therapist in the beginning of each school year.

 

5 Questions to ask your speech therapist:

 

1. What will be the type of service?

 

There are two types of service methods: push-in or pull-out. Push-in is providing speech services in the classroom. The speech therapist collaborates with the teachers and classroom staff. This method allows the speech therapist to target social interactions within the classroom setting. Therapy in the classroom is most beneficial for children demonstrating difficulty with participation in the classroom. It is a great way to work on social skills, reading comprehension, or other language goals that may be impacting one’s academic success. Benefits include peer models, not missing instructional time, collaboration between classroom staff, and addressing specific academic concerns. Disadvantages include classroom distraction and limited one-on-one instruction.

Pull-out method performs speech therapy in the designated speech room. Services may be conducted in a group or individual setting. Pull-out method is recommended for children with articulation goals or specific language concerns. Advantages of pull-out allows specific instruction and intervention in a small group setting. The lesson can be child-specific and independent from the classroom curriculum of that day. The disadvantages of pull-out is that the child is taken away from peer models and may be pulled out during classroom instruction.

 

2. What will be the group size?

 

Group size varies depending on grade, speech goals and time of day. Most school groups fluctuate between three to five students in a group.

 

3. How will be the groups be divided?

 

Groups can be divided in a variety of ways: grade level, type of speech therapy (articulation, language, social), or ability level. Knowing how the group is divided is important to make sure your child is receiving the adequate amount of personalized instruction.

 

4. What will the weekly schedule be?

 

Each school speech therapist creates their weekly schedule differently. It is important to know how often and the amount of time your child will be receiving services. Will it be once a week for 20-30 minutes or three times a week for 15 minute increments.

 

5. What are the goals of therapy?

 

This is the most important question to ask your speech therapist. The speech therapist will have long term goals for the length of the IEP, as well as short term goals she/he will be targeting during sessions. Ask the therapist what goals to work on at home to facilitate carryover into the home environment.

 

For more information on speech therapy services outside school, contact Lumiere Children’s Therapy at 312.242.1665 or www.lumierechild.com.

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Resources:

School Services Frequently Asked Questions. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.asha.org/slp/schools/school-services-Frequently-Asked-questions/#ed2

School-Based Service Delivery in Speech-Language Pathology. (n.d.). Retrieved August 14, 2018, from https://www.asha.org/SLP/schools/School-Based-Service-Delivery-in-Speech-Language-Pathology/

Baumel, J. (n.d.). What is an IEP? Retrieved August 14, 2018, from https://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/what-is-an-iep/

 

 

Parent Resources: Transitioning to Kindergarten

As the 2018-2019 school year approaches, backpacks fill with new school supplies, desks receive new nametags, and excitement fills the air. Although starting a new school year is nerve-racking for most children, beginning elementary school for the first time brings on a new level of excitement...and fear. Starting kindergarten is an adjustment for both parents and kids, so we want to help you begin the school year with ease by learning about prerequisite skills for kindergarten and how to prepare for the first day of school!

Skills Needed For Kindergarten

           Kindergarten is an opportunity for your child to develop social skills, self-care, and academic skills independently. Kindergarten allows children to explore new opportunities without relying on the constant assistance from caregivers. With that being said, the independence that kindergarten permits may be initially challenging for children. The following is a suggested guideline of prerequisite skills and activities to prepare your child for success before entering kindergarten. This list is only a guideline as kindergarten curriculums and expectations vary.

 

1. Identify some letters of the alphabet.

 

  • Start with the letters in your child’s name for motivation. For instance, if your daughter’s name is Kelly, you can point out the letter “K” in books, magazines, and advertisements.

  • Refrigerator letters are versatile toys that can be used in a variety of ways for letter recognition. Play I-spy while cooking and eating, such as ‘I spy the letter “A”’ and have your child point out the letter. Play hide-and-seek by hiding a letter and asking your child to find the letter “B” in the kitchen. Point to the letters as a point of reference while getting food out of the fridge. For instance, “I am getting broccoli; broccoli starts with the letter B”.

  • The following are enjoyable games that incorporate letter recognition; alphabet matching game, alphabet puzzle, and alphabet go-fish.

 

2. Grip a pencil, crayon, or marker with the thumb and forefinger, supporting the tip.

 

  • Improve hand muscles by rolling and forming shapes with Play-Doh.

  • Use a variety of writing instruments and coloring books to entice creativity. Crayons, markers, chalk, paint dot markers, and magnetic drawing board are all great options!

 

 3. Use art materials (scissors, glue, paint) with relative ease.

 

  

4. Write first name.

 

After learning the first two prerequisites, the next skill to practice is writing one’s name.  Make it fun by writing in shaving cream or using bath crayons during bath time!

 

 5. Count to 10.

 

6. Able to self-dress.

 

  • Although dressing your children in the morning saves time and energy, it restricts them from learning opportunities to self-dress. Aim to leave a few extra minutes each morning to let your children practice getting dressed for the day.
  • Read more about activities for tying shoes and zippering.

 

7.  Clean up toys or activities independently.

 

In kindergarten, children are expected to clean up toys, art supplies, school materials, and other activities independently. Give the expectation to clean up toys once finished playing at home to encourage this skill. Once your child loses interest in a toy, sing the clean up song together while putting each item in its respected place.

 

  8. Listen to a story without interrupting.

 

Sustaining adequate attention during stories is challenging for children. When reading a book, set a certain number of book pages or set a timer as a visual reminder for the amount of listening time. Continue to increase listening time until your child is able to listen to a full story or children’s book.

 

   9. Follow 1-2 step directions.

 

  •  Following 1-2 step directions is required for most activities during the school day.  Make following directions fun by playing Simon says with the whole family!

  • Independently use bathroom.

  • For most kindergarten programs, potty training is required. Read our previous posts on potty training tips and potty training with speech problems.

           If your child has not mastered the following skills, do not fret. The skills will continue to develop and form throughout kindergarten. Allow opportunities for your child to become more self-efficient and demonstrate their independence.

 

The First Day of Kindergarten

           Being prepared for the first day of school can help smooth the new transition. Most kindergarten programs provide an open house night leading up to the school year, allowing students to meet the teacher, explore the classroom, and greet fellow classmates. Attending the open house is highly encouraged for families, so your child can become more familiar with their new environment prior to the first day.

           Establishing a structured sleep and meal schedule prior to the first day will help your child adjust accordingly. Set a strict bedtime and morning routine so your child is well rested the first week. Regulate mealtimes at home so that lunch is scheduled at the same time every day.

           Plan a “kindergarten practice day” at home. Take an hour out of the day to walk through possible activities your child may experience. Some examples include wearing a backpack, standing in line, listening to stories, participating in a craft, and singing a song. Your child would probably love to role-play a typical day of school, and feel more comfortable knowing expected activities.

           Finally, build excitement for the first day of school. Starting kindergarten should be exhilarating for children. Involve your child in the purchasing of school supplies, packing lunch, and picking out their first day outfit. On the day of, allow extra time to spend the morning together by eating breakfast and taking some first day photographs.

 

Expectations of the First Day

 

           It is easy to imagine the first day of school to be picture perfect as a parent or caregiver. Although kindergarten is a big milestone in your child’s life, avoid setting high expectations for the first day. Children may also experience negative feelings after the first few days.

 

1.     They may cry. It is not because your child doesn’t want to go to school or is not ready; it just means they are scared of the unknown. With peer models and the support of the teacher, your child will adjust and learn how fun school can be!

 

2.     They will be tired. Adjusting to a full school schedule is hard for children. The first few weeks will be a transition. Expect your child to be tired and sometimes cranky, at home.

 

3.     They may not want to go back. Kindergarten places responsibilities and expectations on children. Following classroom rules and listening to the teacher can seem intimidating to them. As they become more comfortable with the routine of the classroom, they will begin to enjoy attending school on a daily basis.

 

Happy first day of school!📚😄

 

LUMIERE THERAPY TEAM🖐️

 

 

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Resources:

Herzog, Danielle. “What to Expect When Your Child Goes to Kindergarten.” The Washington Post, WP Company, 7 Aug. 2015, www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2015/08/07/what-to-expect-when-your-child-goes-to-kindergarten/?noredirect=on.

“Kindergarten Readiness: What Skills Your Child Should Have.” Scholastic Publishes Literacy Resources and Children's Books for Kids of All Ages, www.scholastic.com/parents/school-success/school-life/grade-by-grade/preparing-kindergarten.html.

 

Physical Therapy: In-Toeing and Out-Toeing

The first year of life is full of new beginnings, between crawling, pulling up to stand, and finally walking! Watching your child take their first steps can be both exciting and nerve-racking. The first steps may look different for each child.  While watching your children explore the world on their feet, you may observe that their toes point inward or outward. Learn more about the causes and treatment of in-toeing or out-toeing below.

Andrew Seaman

Andrew Seaman

In-Toeing or “Pigeon Toe”

            In-toeing, commonly known as “pigeon toe”, is when the toes face into each other while walking or running. This is commonly seen in infants and young children. In-toeing may be caused through hereditary genes or the baby’s positioning in the womb. If a parent demonstrated in-toeing as an infant or child, it is likely they will pass down the gene to their children. An infant may also develop in-toeing due to small feet movement and positioning in the womb. In-toeing is typically not painful for children and does not lead to arthritis.

There are three types of in-toeing: Tibial Torsion, Metatarsus Addactus, and Femoral Anteversion. 

Tibial Torsion

When the shinbone (tibia bone) is tilting inward causing the feet to point in. It is the most common cause of in-toeing in infants and young children typically under the age of two years old. It is typically due to positioning in the womb, and is noticeable at an early age. Tibial torsion frequently straightens out once the child begins to walk, but may take up to 6-12 months to fully correct. Although tibial torsion does not typically require intervention, surgery may be recommended after the age of eight for more severe shin rotations.  

Metatarsus Adductus

When the front half of the foot, or forefoot, is turned inward. Studies have shown that metatarsus adductus may spontaneously recover without intervention in the majority of cases. Manual stretches of the forefoot can improve metatarsus adductus and may be provided by the child’s pediatrician, nurse, or physical therapist. In the rare case that metatarsus adductus does not correct on its own, feet casts can stretch the soft tissues of the forefoot to straighten out the foot. 

Femoral Anteversion

When the upper end of the thighbone (femor), close to the hip, has an increased twist causing the feet to turn in. It is usually not detected before 4-6 years old. A common symptom of femoral anteversion is sitting in the “w- position”. Treatment may include physical therapy to teach the correct positioning of walking, and occasionally, braces to shift the bone. 

Femoral retroversion

The thighbone (femur) is angled backwards relative to the hip joint, resulting in outward feet positioning. Femoral retroversion is less common than femoral anteversion.

Out-Toeing or Duck Feet

Out-toeing is when the child’s feet point outward as they are walking and running. Out-toeing occurs less frequently than in-toeing and may be due to fetal positioning, abnormal growths, and/or underlying neurological problems. Unlike in-toeing, out-toeing may result in pain over time. There are three causes of out-toeing in children: Flatfeet, Hip Contracture, and Femoral Retroversion. 

Flat feet

A child is considered to have flat feet if they do not have an arch in their foot. If an arch does not form, the foot may appear to turn outward. Out-toeing due to flat feet does not require medical intervention and rarely causes pain. 

Hip contracture

An infant’s hip may be externally rotated due to their positioning in the uterus. The external hip contracture may cause hip tightness as they begin to walk resulting in out-toeing. Hip contracture will spontaneously resolve on its own, so out-toeing does not require treatment if it’s due to hip contracture. 

Treatment for In-Toeing and Out-Toeing

 In the majority of cases for in-toeing and out-toeing, braces, special shoes, and surgery are not required. Most children will spontaneously recover if their condition is not associated with an underlying neurological disorder.

Children may require intervention if the following persists:

·     Not improved by the age of three

·     Complaining of excess pain (especially for in-toeing)

·     One foot more turned than the other

·     Other developmental delays such as fine motor, gross motor, and/or language development. 

·     Gait abnormalities (deviation from normal walking)

            Physical therapy can help provide awareness of correct foot positioning when walking. Physical therapy may be recommended if the issue does not resolve on its own in a reasonable amount of time. If you feel like your child would benefit from a physical evaluation for in-toeing or out-toeing, contact Lumiere Children’s Therapy.

 

LUMIERE THERAPY TEAM🖐️

 

References: 

Children's Hospital. (2014, August 24). Metatarsus Adductus. Retrieved from https://www.chop.edu/conditions-diseases/metatarsus-adductus

Children's Hospital. (2014, August 24). Femoral Anteversion. Retrieved from https://www.chop.edu/conditions-diseases/femoral-anteversion

Gupta, R. C. (Ed.). (2015, February). In-toeing & Out-toeing in Toddlers. Retrieved from https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/gait.html

Intoeing - OrthoInfo - AAOS. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/intoeing/

Media, H. M. (n.d.). Out-Toeing. Retrieved from https://www.chortho.com/common-conditions/out-toeing

Pigeon Toe (In-toeing). (2016, November 07). Retrieved from https://uichildrens.org/health-library/pigeon-toe-toeing