Child Physical Therapy

Child Physical Therapy: Jumping!

Jumping feet first into muddy puddles as water splashed onto our rain boots is a fond childhood memory many of us experienced. Even though jumping in puddles creates a dirty, wet mess for many parents, jumping is an important gross motor milestone for children. 

 trec_lit

trec_lit

Toddlers first learn how to jump off low surfaces such as the last step or curb around 24 months. Between 26- 36 months, children will gain the strength and confidence to jump up from a leveled surface, the ground. Jumping requires balance, coordination, strength, and courage. The first step to learning to jump is exploration of balance. 2-year-olds may begin by shifting their weight back and forth to experience the sensation of one foot in the air.

            Each child learns to jump differently as they explore one’s body weight and balance. Some may jump with both feet on first jump, and others mays jump with one foot in front of the other. Most children learn to jump through exploration, but for children that seem reluctant or uninterested, here are some tips to encourage their first jump!   

·     Model

Make jumping look fun and adventurous by squatting really low and jumping off the ground. Model jumping over a toy, jumping to touch the ceiling, or jumping on a trampoline. Your child will begin to show more interest after watching family members model the skill. 

·     Teach squats

The first step to learning to jump is bending your knees low to the ground and standing back up. Squats not only mimic the movement of jumping, but they provide strengthening of the necessary muscles.

·     Frog jumps

The next step to learning to jump is squatting low and hopping off the ground. This version is slightly easier than jumping from standing tall, and provides more visuals. Pretend to be frogs jumping from one lily pad to the next! Make it more fun by dressing in green and shouting “ribbit ribbit”.

·     Hold hands

Holding your child’s hand as they jump off a small step or sidewalk curb can provide a steady support. Jumping off of a higher ground requires less strength and skills but allows the child to explore jumping. 

·     Motivate

Provide targets such as neon tape around and encourage your child to jump from spot to spot. Draw a line with a chalk on the sidewalk for your child to jump over or draw a full hopscotch board!

·     Feedback

As with any new skill, give your child positive accolades along the way. “Wow, look at you bend your knees” or “Look how high you jump” can go a long way!

·     Make room

Clear an open space in the house or spend time outdoors for your child to explore gross motor activities without fear of hurting oneself. 

Read more about physical milestones in our post Gross Motor Development.If you feel your child is behind in gross motor development, contact Lumiere Children’s Therapyfor an evaluation. 

 

 

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References:

Drobnjak, Lauren. “CHILD DEVELOPMENT QUICK TIP: LEARNING HOW TO JUMP.” The Inspired Treehouse, 24 Sept. 2014, theinspiredtreehouse.com/child-development-quick-tip-learning-how-to-jump/.

WhattoExpect. “Running, Climbing, Jumping and Kicking.” Whattoexpect, WhattoExpect, 21 Oct. 2014, www.whattoexpect.com/toddler/run-jump/.

Child Physical Therapy: Autism and Physical Therapy

Children with autism spectrum disorder present with challenges related to social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and language, and sensory processing. Speech, behavior, and occupational therapy is recommended to improve communication, behavior, and sensory deficits in children with autism spectrum disorder. Along with these disciplines, physical therapy is a crucial component of an autism treatment team. Physical therapists focus on improving a child’s balance, posture, and incoordination to improve engagement and participation in everyday activities.

 Jake Guild - Flickr

Jake Guild - Flickr

What is physical therapy?

Pediatric physical therapists help guide children through physical milestones. Areas of intervention include gross motor skills, balance/coordination skills, strengthening, and functional mobility. 

What are common physical deficits in ASD?

Children with autism spectrum disorder may experience some of the following physical challenges:

·      Decreased eye-hand coordination

·      Difficulty controlling posture

·      Lack of Coordination

·      Poor balance and instability

·      Low muscle tone

Research has shown that children with autism may also demonstrate toe-walking ankle stiffness, and motor apraxia.

Physical Therapy treatment for ASD

Pediatric physical therapy utilizes play and therapy techniques to improve balance and posture in children with autism. Improving posture in sitting, standing, and walking can build endurance and increase attention during school-time activities. Once a child feels secured and balanced, they can focus on other areas such as socializing, interacting, and playing. Physical therapists improve the lives of Children with ASD by improving their day-to-day functioning.

 

Learn more about Autism on our blog: Autism and Sensory Integration, Autism Awareness, Art and Autism, and many more articles!

 

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Resources:

“Autism Spectrum Disorder.” American Physical Therapy Association, 31 Oct. 2014, www.moveforwardpt.com/SymptomsConditionsDetail.aspx?cid=a6482e75-65c6-4c1f-be36-5f4a847b2042.

“The Role of the Pediatric Physical Therapist for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.”Center for Autism Research, www.carautismroadmap.org/the-role-of-the-pediatric-physical-therapist-for-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorder/.

Wang, Judy. “Physical Therapy for Children with Autism.” North Shore Pediatric Therapy, Judy Wang, PT, DPT Http://nspt4kids.Com/Wp-Content/Uploads/2016/05/nspt_2-Color-logo_noclaims.Png, 13 Jan. 2015, nspt4kids.com/autism/physical-therapy-children-autism/.